Is The Philippines Considered A Part Of The – Brookes Point Palawan

http://climatestar.org/‘The Pearl Of The Orient The alluring beauty of the Far East is seen through its contrasts of culture, lifestyle, and climate. Somehow everyone of us has the desire to live and settle into a paradise that would provide ease and quiet enjoyment. To many the East could provide such a place: a place that would satisfy every transient and visitor in their desires for a great deal of pleasure – where life could be more interesting and exceptionally unique. The PHILIPPINES is an archipelago that is known as the “Pearl of Oriental Beauty and Enchantment” because of its rare scenic views and tourist attractions. It consists of more than 7,000 islands and islets; it is located off the southeast coast of the Asian continent. It has three principal Islands: the Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao. The Philippines has a total land area of 116,000 sq. miles; its neighbors are Taiwan to the north, Hong Kong to the northwest, Brunei and Malaysia to the southwest and Vietnam to the west.’http://www.escapeartist.com/efam/73/Sail… ‘The Philippines, commonly known as the “Pearl of the Orient” is an archipelago of 7107 islands with a wide variety of great destinations considered by many as paradise. From the hustle and bustle of the great city of Manila to many of the true white-sand beaches and virgin forests scattered throughout the islands, it is a place where everyone can find something that can suit their taste.’http://exoticphilippines.blogspot.com/ ‘The Orient’s Realm of… The Philippines General Region The Philippines, the “Pearl of the Orient Seas,” is an archipelago of 7,107 islands in the South China Sea. These islands have been populated since neolithic, although ninety percent of the population has lived on the nine largest islands: Cebu, Leyte, Luzon, Mindanao, Mindoro, ******, Palawan, Panay, and Samar.’http://www.ancientworlds.net/aw/Places/P… From the source link below, you’ll find around 26,000 more references to The Philippines as a part of the Orient and “The Philippines – The Pearl of the Orient” Lots to read about, enjoy…

How The Geography Of The Country Affect The – Brookes Point

In many ways, it affects us.
Due to our position in the globe (as a tropical country), we only have 2 seasons, wet and dry. We are also on the Pacific Ring of Fire, where the volcanoes are positioned like a “belt” surrounding the Pacific Ocean. Do you know Mt. Pinatubo? It was known for its explosion in 1991. The ashfall even reached Japan.
Speaking of calamities, the eastern Philippines is the most affected region when typhoons come. Especially the Bicol Region. Some earthquakes are also present, but mostly they are just on the magnitude of 2-4 (the normal ones).
As an archipelago, many provinces made fishing their primary means of industry. Others are proud of their white-sand beaches and surfing industries. Those really help the tourism in our country.
Here in the Metro, the Pasig River lies on the cities like Makati, Marikina, Manila, etc. The Pasig River was considered biologically dead due to the pollution made by people who live on the shores of the river (squatters).
On the north, people enjoy mountains and highlands. Some of them are the Sierra Madre Mountains and the highlands of Benguet and Mountain Province. Baguio City was known as the “Summer Capital of the Philippines” since it’s cold there coz it’s like a city on a mountain. It also helped our tourism.
Some of our tourist attractions here are Boracay Island (white-sand beaches), Puerto Galera (beach), El Nido in Palawan (caves and beaches), SM Mall of Asia (really a huge mall), festivals (like the Ati-Atihan), and many others.
Our country has many things to offer. And besides, we’re on the list of the happiest and most respectful people in Asia!

Discover Mt. Mantalingahan, the Highest Peak in Palawan Hotels

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In 2007, the Mt. Mantalingahan in Palawan province was proposed by its local government as a candidate for becoming protected land. In 2009, after two years of campaigning for public awareness of the animal biodiversity present in the site including the native tribes living in the mountain, it was finally declared as a protected landscape, thus shielding from harm not just the ecological system of the mountain but also the cultural heritage of the people of Palawan.

Geography

Mt. Mantalingahan is located in the Southern part of Palawan covering 126, 000 hectares of mountain terrains within the territorial land of five municipalities including Rizal, Quezon, Bataraza, Sofronio Espanola and Brooke’s Point. With its peak reaching up to 6,800 feet above sea level, it is said to be the highest mountain in Palawan.

High Biodiversity and Rich Ecology

The fascinating ecological finds in the mountain during the biological diversity survey of local and foreign biologists in 2007 has led concerned citizens and authorities to endorse the land as protected area. New animal species of rats, bats and birds were discovered. The survey also yielded a discovery of land orchid species. There were also undescribed species that had not been sighted for more than 40 years. The experts’ knowledge of the mountain’s biodiversity has expanded as a result and new records were made.

Indigenous Community

There were undocumented stories of the early people who lived in the mountain who, legend has it, were cannibals. The Tau’t Daram were said to possess supernatural abilities that were feared throughout the mountain. But after the death of its leader, the tribe died out.
Now, the mountain is home to about 3, 000 mountain dwellers belonging to two indigenous groups, the Palaw’ans and the Tau’t Bato. These people live on their animal kills and on fruits growing naturally on the land.

Climbing Activity

The Mt. Mantalingahan is said to be one of the most difficult climbs in the country. Even without the threat of malaria, climbers must be physically fit and emotionally ready to be able to climb up the summit. The trail via the Tau’t Bato domain starts at Rizal, and the peak will be reached on the third day. Points of attraction during the climb include close encounters with the people of the Tau’t Bato tribe, the wild mountain flora and the century-old trees. It will take a total of five days to climb the mountain, and the view at the top is said to be magnificent and nothing like the view from the other mountains in the area with the same sights as the whole South Palawan and the surrounding seas.

The on-going exploration of biologists in the discovery of new species found in Mt. Mantalingahan plays an important role in the preservation of life in the mountain. The Presidential Decree that proclaimed the land as protected landscape also helps the protection and conservation efforts of the locals against mining and logging. Indeed, prudent consumption of all resources found in the mountain will ultimately help in preserving not just the ecological system but also the ancestral roots of the native dwellers.

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Palawan Realities – Best Philippine Attractions

There is now a feverish campaign to gather 10 million signatures to keep Palawan free from mining.  What appears to be an advocacy group called Save Palawan Movement is reportedly fronting for the foundation arm of a giant radio-TV network.  Its main campaigner, it appears, is Ms. Gina Lopez.

Puerto Princesa El Nido

In an effort to clear things up, the Palawan Council for Sustainable Development (PCSD) sent an e-mail statement to this columnist in what it calls “sifting fact from fiction in Palawan.”

For example, the PCSD, created in 1992 through the Strategic Environmental Plan, ensures the sustainability of Palawan, Lopez says. “Since sustainability is holistic by its very definition,” then PCSD should aim for the “preservation of non-renewable resources.”

In answer, the PCSD statement said the truth is that nowhere in the law does it explicitly provide for “preservation of non-renewable resources.” If that principle applied to the Middle Eastern countries, for instance, many nations would still be living in the Stone Age, since the former would keep their oil resources undeveloped and intact.

t is the policy of the State to protect, develop, and conserve the country’s natural resources and to preserve and enhance the environment while pursuing socio-economic goals. The state can promote sustainable development through proper conservation, utilization, and development of natural resources to provide optimum yields on a continuing basis. In other words, we should use our natural resources in a responsible way.

Lopez claims that under the PCSD, Palawan has actually lost 16 percent of its forest cover compared to other provinces. PCSD was supposed to protect Palawan because of its biodiversity, and yet, she says, among the provinces in the country, Palawan appears to be the most ravaged. What is worse, she added,  is that the 16 percent decline was recorded before the Mining Act was passed.

The PCSD disputes this assertion. In 1992, Palawan’s forest was recorded at 738,886, representing about 52 % of Palawan’s total land area. In 2005, the forest cover went down to 46%, appearing to have declined by about 6%, or 5,500 has. per year for the 13 years from 1992 to 2005. The decrease in forest cover is not due to mining but mostly to conversion of public lands into alienable and disposable to support the government’s land titling and agrarian land reform programs, the statement stated.

he reported forest loss is  comparatively very low as the deforestation rate was  a record high  at 19,000 has./year  in the early 80s before the SEP Law was passed, according to Romeo Dorado, OIC-exec. director of the PCSD staff.

Lopez further claims that opening Palawan to more mining companies will lead to massive deforestation.

The PCSD says the allegation is grossly inaccurate and lacking in well-established data support. PCSD scientific findings directly relate actual loss of the standing trees in Palawan not primarily to mining but to continuing harvest of timber for domestic consumption, forest land use conversion for agricultural development, and continuous establishment of human settlements to accommodate the province’s increasing population growth rate of an average of 3.5% per annum, mostly due to in-migration.

Moreover, according to PCSD, the disastrous forest fires in 1998 that engulfed southern Palawan, particularly Bulanjao Range and Mt. Mantalingahan tip, was aggravated by the El Niño phenomenon.  The 1998 forest fires practically shaved off a substantial portion of the existing natural forest.

Significantly, DAR’s  implementation of the CARP law for the past two  decades which necessitated issuance of CLOAs, including the national government’s land titling program implemented by the Land Management Bureau of the DENR, likewise converted about 35,260 has. of the forest lands in southern and central Palawan into agriculture and development. This forest land use conversion represented almost 50% of the forest loss, the PCSD statement continued.

Lopez argues that mining takes away the right of the people, especially the poor, to fish in the sea and to enjoy nature for free.

The few mining companies operating in Palawan dispute this. MacroAsia, for instance, sponsors on the average 120 scholars every school year. None of the scholars are malnourished, it says. And it also says it has provided 29 jetmatic water pumps to make potable water more accessible to the communities.

Lopez also alleges that mining activities in  Palawan do not enjoy social acceptability. She cites the case of Brooke’s Point, where a  consultation was held in two barangays where a mining company was going to operate. The “No to Mining” side won the vote, she says, but the PCSD proceeded with the project nevertheless.

The mining firm in question maintains that the public consultation in Mambalot was conducted as part of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process, supervised by the DENR and EMB. It was mainly intended to solicit the concerns and issues of the host communities, hence they were encouraged to voice out whatever apprehensions they may have. The meeting was not intended to prove the social acceptability of the projects and voting was not conducted.

MacroAsia claims that its host communities support the project as evidenced by the favorable endorsement from three barangays and the municipality of Brookes’ Point. In addition, the indigenous peoples in the area entered into a MoA with MacroAsia granting their Free and Prior Informed Consent.

(source: TAK Radio)

===============

This has been brought to you by Best Philippine Attractions in partnership with The Big NM – Network Management for Filipinos and the radio program Talakayan at Kalusugan (DWBL 1242 Mon-Fri 4-5pm)

Related posts:

  1. Robinson’s to Open Palawan’s First Full Service Mall in Q4
  2. Vote for Puerto Princesa Underground River

Palawan Realities – Best Philippine Attractions

There is now a feverish campaign to gather 10 million signatures to keep Palawan free from mining.  What appears to be an advocacy group called Save Palawan Movement is reportedly fronting for the foundation arm of a giant radio-TV network.  Its main campaigner, it appears, is Ms. Gina Lopez.

Puerto Princesa El Nido

In an effort to clear things up, the Palawan Council for Sustainable Development (PCSD) sent an e-mail statement to this columnist in what it calls “sifting fact from fiction in Palawan.”

For example, the PCSD, created in 1992 through the Strategic Environmental Plan, ensures the sustainability of Palawan, Lopez says. “Since sustainability is holistic by its very definition,” then PCSD should aim for the “preservation of non-renewable resources.”

In answer, the PCSD statement said the truth is that nowhere in the law does it explicitly provide for “preservation of non-renewable resources.” If that principle applied to the Middle Eastern countries, for instance, many nations would still be living in the Stone Age, since the former would keep their oil resources undeveloped and intact.

t is the policy of the State to protect, develop, and conserve the country’s natural resources and to preserve and enhance the environment while pursuing socio-economic goals. The state can promote sustainable development through proper conservation, utilization, and development of natural resources to provide optimum yields on a continuing basis. In other words, we should use our natural resources in a responsible way.

Lopez claims that under the PCSD, Palawan has actually lost 16 percent of its forest cover compared to other provinces. PCSD was supposed to protect Palawan because of its biodiversity, and yet, she says, among the provinces in the country, Palawan appears to be the most ravaged. What is worse, she added,  is that the 16 percent decline was recorded before the Mining Act was passed.

The PCSD disputes this assertion. In 1992, Palawan’s forest was recorded at 738,886, representing about 52 % of Palawan’s total land area. In 2005, the forest cover went down to 46%, appearing to have declined by about 6%, or 5,500 has. per year for the 13 years from 1992 to 2005. The decrease in forest cover is not due to mining but mostly to conversion of public lands into alienable and disposable to support the government’s land titling and agrarian land reform programs, the statement stated.

he reported forest loss is  comparatively very low as the deforestation rate was  a record high  at 19,000 has./year  in the early 80s before the SEP Law was passed, according to Romeo Dorado, OIC-exec. director of the PCSD staff.

Lopez further claims that opening Palawan to more mining companies will lead to massive deforestation.

The PCSD says the allegation is grossly inaccurate and lacking in well-established data support. PCSD scientific findings directly relate actual loss of the standing trees in Palawan not primarily to mining but to continuing harvest of timber for domestic consumption, forest land use conversion for agricultural development, and continuous establishment of human settlements to accommodate the province’s increasing population growth rate of an average of 3.5% per annum, mostly due to in-migration.

Moreover, according to PCSD, the disastrous forest fires in 1998 that engulfed southern Palawan, particularly Bulanjao Range and Mt. Mantalingahan tip, was aggravated by the El Niño phenomenon.  The 1998 forest fires practically shaved off a substantial portion of the existing natural forest.

Significantly, DAR’s  implementation of the CARP law for the past two  decades which necessitated issuance of CLOAs, including the national government’s land titling program implemented by the Land Management Bureau of the DENR, likewise converted about 35,260 has. of the forest lands in southern and central Palawan into agriculture and development. This forest land use conversion represented almost 50% of the forest loss, the PCSD statement continued.

Lopez argues that mining takes away the right of the people, especially the poor, to fish in the sea and to enjoy nature for free.

The few mining companies operating in Palawan dispute this. MacroAsia, for instance, sponsors on the average 120 scholars every school year. None of the scholars are malnourished, it says. And it also says it has provided 29 jetmatic water pumps to make potable water more accessible to the communities.

Lopez also alleges that mining activities in  Palawan do not enjoy social acceptability. She cites the case of Brooke’s Point, where a  consultation was held in two barangays where a mining company was going to operate. The “No to Mining” side won the vote, she says, but the PCSD proceeded with the project nevertheless.

The mining firm in question maintains that the public consultation in Mambalot was conducted as part of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process, supervised by the DENR and EMB. It was mainly intended to solicit the concerns and issues of the host communities, hence they were encouraged to voice out whatever apprehensions they may have. The meeting was not intended to prove the social acceptability of the projects and voting was not conducted.

MacroAsia claims that its host communities support the project as evidenced by the favorable endorsement from three barangays and the municipality of Brookes’ Point. In addition, the indigenous peoples in the area entered into a MoA with MacroAsia granting their Free and Prior Informed Consent.

(source: TAK Radio)

===============

This has been brought to you by Best Philippine Attractions in partnership with The Big NM – Network Management for Filipinos and the radio program Talakayan at Kalusugan (DWBL 1242 Mon-Fri 4-5pm)

Related posts:

  1. Robinson’s to Open Palawan’s First Full Service Mall in Q4
  2. Vote for Puerto Princesa Underground River

Palawan Paradise


Palawan is an island province located in the Philippines. It is located between the southeast of the Sulu Sea and northeast of the South China Sea. Puerto Princess is its provincial capital while the province itself is the largest by land area. The province houses beautiful resorts and beaches as well as a marine park.

The province has various popular destinations like Tubbataha Reef National Marine Park, Aborlan, which is a rural university, Calauit, which is a wildlife sanctuary as well as a game preserve, Narra, Palawan’s Rice Granary,

1600x1200El Nido Palawan Philippines Palawan Paradise

Palawan Butterfly Garden and San Vicente, which is a town that consists of many islands and barangays and has one of the world’s longest beaches.

The province of Palawan offers various activities and breathtaking views from its many locations within Northern and Southern Palawan. One of the many popular places includes the Tabon Caves located in Quezon. The caves have a hundred and thirty eight hectares of deep slopes, rugged cliffs and breathtaking scenery for the visitor to enjoy. Quezon also houses the Tumarbong Falls which is an ideal place for trekking and sightseeing. There are other various attractions in the area including beaches, islands, lakes and a forest cruise.


1600x1200 Palawan Island Philippines Palawan Paradise

Another popular place among visitors who simply want to relax and enjoy the scenery is El Nido, which is one of the jewels of the province. The beauty of the place is unrivaled with its beautiful beaches, huge limestone islands and translucent waters. There are various attractions in this area including Turtle Island, Marble cliffs, Commando beach, Makinit Hot Springs, the Daracuton and Shimizu reefs, and the big and small lagoons that are best explored through snorkeling. Other locations include Port Barton, which is perfect for some laid back relaxation with its beautiful beach, Coron, popular for wreck diving, Sabang, a town that boasts having a National Park with an underground river and Brooke’s Point, that has breathtaking scenery even though activities are limited to mainly farming and fishing.

1024x768 palawan e1361393753236 Palawan Paradise

Palawan offers something for different types of tourists, whether it’s relaxing beaches, white sands, calm scenery or the adventure of exploration in various caves. The province is a captivating place with its fabulous and breathtaking landscape and sun drenched beaches. Considered the country’s last ecological frontier, this province not only houses beautiful resorts and beaches but it is also where two sites of the UNESCO World Heritage are located. Palawan is the perfect place to spend some time with family, loved ones or even alone for an unforgettable, stress free and enjoyable experience.

1680x1050 Palawan Palawan Paradise

Those planning a trip to Palawan can make reservations at the Corto Del Mar Hotel. Located among beautiful scenery in the Coron Town the hotel has many sports, restaurants and cultural hubs nearby. The hotel offers various services, facilities and amenities that include a private pool, massage and a recreational garden. With an ideal location with many of the city’s attractions nearby as well as impeccable service, the hotel not only ensures the complete comfort and enjoyment but an unforgettable stay for guests.

1024x687 Nido Palawan Palawan Paradise

PinExt Palawan Paradise

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